ISOTEC’s airing recommendations

The heating and airing of rooms are significant factors for people to feel comfortable in their homes and working environments. The target is to create a cosy room climate so that mould attack as a result of condensation can be avoided.

 


ISOTEC airing recommendations

Drawing slotted ventilation
Drawing slotted ventilation

1. Airing by windows open a crack

Many people think it is enough to keep their windows open a crack all day (tipped-window airing). But this has serious disadvantages: when outside air temperatures are low, the whole room cools down, cooling primarily the wall areas near the tipped window.


Permanently open windows in winter can even lead to mould growing near the window due to the reduced wall temperatures in the room.

Drawing sudden ventilation
Drawing sudden ventilation

2. Airing by fully open windows

It is better to air by fully opening the window for a short period and then closing it again. This type of window airing permits about thirty times as much air to be exchanged as in the same time period if the window was open a crack.


If the living space is being used normally, experience tells us that it needs to be aired like this with fully open windows at least two to three times a day. Each individual airing time should last long enough to exchange all the air in the room. Another advantage of airing like this is that the room’s interior wall surfaces and wall masses will only cool down a little. It is therefore unnecessary to heat the room air up again and use a lot of energy.

 

Drawing of cross ventilation
Drawing of cross ventilation

3. Diagonal airing

It is even better to open opposite doors and windows when airing. Briefly: create a draught! In diagonal airing, the room’s air is exchanged even quicker. This means even less energy is needed to warm the room’s air after airing.

IsoTech